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What's On 2006

Daily Event Guide
July 2006
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Monthly Event Guide
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Going Out in Galway

Going Out Restaurants
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Salthill Airshow

A Red Arrows Hawk aircraft pulls up from a dive during the Salthill Airshow. Sunday 6 July 2003. Photo: Joe Desbonnet.
A Red Arrows Hawk aircraft pulls up from a dive during at the Salthill Airshow. Sunday 6 July 2003. Photo: Joe Desbonnet.

The Vixen Break at the end of the Red Arrows display. In the background is LE Ciara (Irish Naval Service) and the Clare mountains in the distance. Photo: Joe Desbonnet The Vixen Breakat the end of the Red Arrows display. In the background is LE Ciara (Irish Naval Service) and the Clare mountains in the distance. Photo: Joe Desbonnet

Click here to access Airshow gallery

Around Galway

A labrador watches the sunset at Salthill, Sunday 6 April 2003. Photo: Joe Desbonnet
A labrador watches the sunset at Salthill, Sunday 6 April 2003.
Photo: Joe Desbonnet
Claddagh at night. Photo: Joe Desbonnet
Claddagh at night. Photo: Joe Desbonnet

Salmon Weir Bridge

Salmon Weir Bridge
Salmon Weir Bridge, with Court House in background
Salmon Weir
Salmon Weir

The Salmon Weir Bridge was constructed in 1818 and it was intended to link the old Gaol (on the site of the cathedral) with the courthouse, a distance of no more than two hundred yards! It was also to provide a connection with the main road to Connemara. The river was first drained between 1845 and 1849 and a regulating Weir was built.

Between 1952 and 1959, the Corrib was again drained and the present regulating weir was built. This is the largest and most impressive weir in the country with a water flow of 4 million gallons per second at full flood, and 100,000 gallons per second at low flood. The tremendous rush of water through the weir is absolutely breathtaking at full flood, and the bridge is regularly lined with locals and tourists alike, absorbed by the spectacle.


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